Campus Crime: Legal, Social, and Policy Perspectives (3rd by Bonnie S. Fisher, John J. Sloan III

By Bonnie S. Fisher, John J. Sloan III

This 3rd version underscores that curiosity within the felony, social, and coverage contexts of campus crime has no longer waned. one of the reasons of this new version is the need to percentage with readers the developments that experience happened in realizing campus crime, specially the dynamics of faculty pupil victimization, and efforts to successfully deal with campus safeguard concerns. awarded in 3 sections, the 1st examines the felony context of crime via supplying 5 chapters whose concentration is on the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus safeguard Policy and Campus Crime facts Act and its state-level progenies. The chapters acquaint the reader with the genesis and evolution of Clery, the present kingdom of study referring to public information and influence, the implications and impression of the National Campus Sexual attack coverage Study, and national-level comparative research of country established Clery-style laws. The six chapters of part II tackle issues corresponding to victimization premiums of scholars as opposed to nonstudents; way of life theories explaining pupil victimization; how alcohol use and abuse are correlates to pupil victimization; an summary of the literature at the sexual victimization of faculty girls; and an research of the level, nature, and impression of stalking and cyberstalking behaviors perpetrated opposed to and by means of students. The 4 chapters of the ultimate part specialise in the evolution, association, and practices of campus legislation enforcement organisations, the demanding situations of imposing alcohol legislation, and the demanding situations awarded by way of high-tech crimes related to the web, info platforms, and expertise. The book’s aim used to be to assemble authors who may provide the most up-tp-date photograph and a severe research of matters about the criminal, social, and coverage contexts of campus crime and defense. The textual content represents the main updated source for campus adminstrators, legislations enforcent and protection group of workers, criminologists, counseling pros, political scientists, sociologists, attorneys, and coverage advocates.

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Extra resources for Campus Crime: Legal, Social, and Policy Perspectives (3rd Edition)

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These studies not only have identified individual- and campus-level factors associated with different types of victimization, but present statistical models that predict students’ risk of experiencing victimization. Coupled with these empirical studies of individuals are studies examining “hot spots” of crime on campus; that is, identifying specific places on campus where most crime occurs and explaining these spatial patterns (Robinson & Roh, 2013). Collectively, findings from these studies primarily have defined the focus of study of campus crime, but their findings have also established the need for further investigation into how and why college students and their property are victimized.

Schools also are allowed to disclose information concerning registered sex offenders enrolled as students or working on the campus without prior written or other consent from the student. CRITIQUES OF CLERY. Student advocacy and campus watchdog groups have hailed legislative efforts to make campuses safer. However, academicians interested in campus crime and safety issues have identified inherent limitations to Clery and its mandates. Research has provided ample empirical evidence which questions the usefulness of Clery in addressing campus crime.

Campus police officers have entered an era in which partnerships with students, faculty, and staff members; interacting with people on campus; engaging in foot and bicycle patrol; and participating in programs such as “campus watch,” are stressed. Through these tactics, campus police departments are Campus Crime Policy 19 partnering with members of the campus community to identify and eliminate common problems. Additionally, campus police agencies, like their municipal counterparts, have begun experimenting with greater use of information technology including crime mapping, geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS), statistical analyses of crime patterns on campus (commonly referred to as COMPSTAT or “compare statistics” (Dabney, 2010), “hot spots” analyses (Robinson & Roh, 2013), and to engage in “intelligence led” policing (Ratcliffe, 2003).

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